Spectacular Photos of Fly Geyser

Fly Geyser (or Fly Ranch Geyser) is a a small geothermal geyser that is located approximately 20 miles north of Gerlach, in Washoe County, Nevada. Accidentally created in 1916 during well drilling, it now perches on top a series of terraces around its mound, spraying hot waters high into the sky in the early morning hours. Its rainbow like colors caused by the thermophilic algae that thrive in moist and hot environment.

Photo credit: Christian Klepp
Spectacular Photos of Fly Geyser

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Caño Cristales- the river runs away to paradise

If you ever make your way to Columbia, try and time it just right so that you see Caño Cristales in all its glory. Often it has been referred to as the “river of five colors”, “the river that ran away to paradise,” and “the most beautiful river in the world.” Caño Cristales is one of those destinations you almost have to see to believe. Due to its remote location, it can only be accessed by horse, which makes seeing this river even more special. During a brief span between the wet and dry seasons, when the water level is just right, the many varieties of algae and moss bloom in a dazzling display of colors; blotches of amarillo, blue, green, black, and red–and a thousand shades in between.

Caño Cristales- the river of five colors

Caño Cristales- the river of five colors

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Amazing Animal Architect

Today, I am to introduce you with our amazing animal architect. Ant, whose colonies that extend farther than the Great Wall of China; termite who mounds that tower at nearly twice the relative height of the Burj Dubai (tallest skyscraper in the world);Spider who create incredible large web and beaver, the born dam architect ……

1. Caddisflies

Caddisflies are considered underwater architects because many species use silt for building throughout their larval life. Caddisflies can be loosely divided into three behavioral groups based on this use of silt: retreat-making caddisflies, case-making caddisflies, and free-living caddisflies. Those that build retreats build a net or retreat from silt and other materials and use it to catch food items such as algae, aquatic invertebrates and zooplankton from the flowing stream. Case-making caddisflies make portable cases using silk along with substrate materials such as small fragments of rock, sand, small pieces of twig, aquatic plants, or sometimes silk alone. Many use the retreats or cases throughout their larval life, adding to, or enlarging them as they grow. These may look very much like bagworm cases, which are constructed by various moth species that are not aquatic. Free-living caddisflies do not build retreats or carry portable cases until they are ready to pupate.

amazing animal architect

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